Three Divorce Mistakes to Avoid

Three Divorce Mistakes to Avoid

When you are facing divorce life can see overwhelming. To make matters worse, in the midst of emotional turmoil you are asked to make life altering financial decisions. This is tough!! We STRONGLY encourage you to hire a divorce team with experts in each area of needed expertise. An experienced, knowledgeable attorney is critical. Next, if you have financial concerns, it makes sense to hire someone to help you with the financial questions and issues in your divorce. A Certified Divorce Financial Analyst or someone trained and experienced specifically in the areas of divorce finance and tax can save you thousands of dollars in your overall settlement.

We have seen many people come into our offices after the divorce details are finalized only to discover they could have done better or they will lose 30% of what they were awarded to taxes. We don’t want this to happen to those still in the divorce process. Be informed! The following are mistakes we see repeatedly when it comes to divorce.

3. The settlement doesn’t take taxes into effect.

If the old saying, “death and taxes are the only sure thing we have in life” holds true, why would you settle divorce negotiations without knowing the tax implications of your settlement. You are going to be taxed, just know what those taxes will be!

What people often find is the tax burden on their half of the marital assets is significantly higher than their spouse’s. This means their “half” of the assets are worth significantly less than they thought! It’s also important to consider when you will be using the assets you were awarded. For example, what’s worth more – $100,000 in an IRA account or $80,000 in a savings account? Well, it depends! What is your tax bracket and how much cash do you need today? If you need cash now, you are better off taking the $80,000 in a savings account. The $100,000 in an IRA is going to have taxes and possibly penalties taken from it so in the end the $100,000 is probably only worth about $65,000 or $75,000. If you don’t need this money for years, the $100,000 in an IRA will probably be better as it will grow tax deferred for many years and will be able to compound on itself quicker than a taxable $80,000 in savings.

2. Pensions are split 50/50 but no one knows what that really means.

Over and over and over I see divorce decrees that order pensions split 50/50 but no one has any idea what will actually happen. When do you start collecting? How much money can you collect when the pension begins? Is there an option to take a lump sum?

Did you inquire about a separate interest Qualified Domestic Relations Order (QDRO) where you can take the funds on your own timeline? Are you subject to your ex-spouses retirement wants or do you have a say in when the funds begin? Will there be a cost of living increase each year? What if you or your spouse dies before you start collecting? Will it still pay you?

Pensions are complex financial tools with variables many do not consider. In addition, the devil is in the details with the pension plans. Know what you are getting and your options!! If you have a pension you really need a financial expert on your team who understands pensions and QDRO’s so you can make informed decisions.

1. The biggest mistake – keeping a house you can’t afford.

As a woman I understand becoming emotionally attached to a home – this is where my kids have grown up and where we made many happy memories. This spot on the stairs or the place by the front door is where we took pictures every year on the first day of school. This is where I want my kids to come home to when they are grown with their own children. I get it!! It’s tough to leave the marital home if you have such strong emotional ties. However, time and time again my older divorcing couples are told by their adult children – don’t stay in the house!! We don’t care. We just want you to be financially healthy and strong.

As a financial expert, the first thing I’m going to ask my divorcees to do is create a monthly budget. What does it cost to live in this house? I have witnessed where one or two years down the road the spouse who “won the house” has run out of cash and realized that they can’t sell a window to put food on the table, they can’t refinance because now they don’t have enough income, and they have no choice but to sell. Further, the selling costs are about 8% of the sale – all of which could have been split 50/50 with a spouse if the house had been sold during the pendency of the divorce.

The sum this up, please realize you don’t know what you don’t know. Bring in the right experts for your divorce to make sure you are smart, you are informed, and you make the best decisions you can with all the information! Don’t go this alone. As we say at Divorce Strategies Group, “You only have one chance to get it right!” Let us help. Call today for a complimentary consultation to discuss your situation and let us help you start on the right path.

Dividing 529 Plans in Divorce

Dividing 529 Plans in Divorce

Year after year, you and your spouse have been saving for college through a 529 savings account. Now that divorce is pending, it’s time to think about spending the money you’ve put aside for your children as a co-parent.  Who will be in control of how much is withdrawn and how it’ll be used?  What are the rules?  How do you put this in writing in a way that makes everyone feel secure about using these funds?   How will you handle contributing to the account going forward? Use the following to learn how dividing 529 plans in divorce works and what steps to take going forward.

CONTRIBUTIONS

You can save up to $15,000 per parent in a 529 account or $30,000 total.  Grandparents can also contribute up to $15,000 per person per year. Contributing more than $15,000 per person would need to be reported to the IRS as a gift. However, a 529 account can be “superfunded” with contributions of $75,000 per person or $150,000 per couple—which uses up your federal gift-tax exclusion for 5 years.  So each parent and the grandparents can still contribute a considerable amount to the 529 accounts.

DISTRIBUTIONS

What can you use this money for? Which expenses trigger taxes and penalties? If you do things right, no penalties or federal income tax—and, in many states, no state income tax—will be due on your withdrawals. But learning by trial and error can be costly at tax time, and more importantly, your child could lose out on financial aid if you’re not careful. So learn the ins and outs ahead of time.

Here’s a guide to help you make your 529 savings go as far as possible.

Plan for tax-free withdrawals

Qualified withdrawals are federal income tax-free so long as the total withdrawals for the year don’t exceed your child’s adjusted qualified higher education expenses (QHEEs), discussed in #3 below.   To calculate these, add up tuition and fees, room and board, books and supplies, any school-related special services, and computer costs, and then deduct any costs already covered by tax-free educational assistance. Examples include Pell grants, tax-free scholarships and fellowships, tuition discounts, the Veteran’s Educational Assistance Program and tax-free employer educational assistance programs.

You’ll also need to deduct costs used to claim or Lifetime Learning Credit. The basic rule: You can’t double up tax benefits for the same college expenses.

Know which expenses qualify

When you pay qualified education expenses from a 529 account, your withdrawals are tax- and penalty-free. As of 2019, qualified expenses include tuition expenses for elementary, middle, and high schools (private, public, or religious). Although the money may come from multiple 529 accounts, only $10,000 total can be spent each year per beneficiary on elementary, middle, or high school tuition.

Money saved in a 529 plan can also be used to pay qualified expenses associated with college or other postsecondary training institutions. Eligible schools include any college, university, vocational school, or other postsecondary educational institution eligible to participate in a student aid program administered by the US Department of Education.

While funds from a 529 account can be used to pay for expenses required for college, not all expenses qualify. Tuition and fees are considered required expenses and are allowed, but when it comes to room and board, the costs can’t exceed the greater of the following 2 amounts:

  1. The allowance for room and board included in the school’s cost of attendance for federal financial aid calculations
  2. The actual amount charged if the student is living in housing operated by the educational institution

In other words, if your child is planning to live off campus in housing not owned or operated by the college, you can’t claim expenses in excess of the school’s estimates for room and board for attendance there. So it’s important to confirm room and board costs with the school’s financial aid office in advance so you know what to expect. Also, keep in mind that in order for room and board to qualify, your child must be enrolled half time or more.

Textbooks count as an education expense, but only those included on the required reading for the course.  Computers and related equipment and services are considered qualified expenses if they are used primarily by the beneficiary during any of the years that the beneficiary is enrolled at an eligible educational institution. Computer software for sports, games, or hobbies would be excluded unless the software is predominantly educational in nature.

It’s important to keep receipts and make sure that qualified items are purchased separately from nonqualified items. Be careful to avoid expenses that don’t qualify—for example, equipment used primarily for amusement or entertainment doesn’t qualify. These and other lifestyle expenses, like insurance, sports expenses, health club dues, and travel and transportation costs, will have to be funded through other resources. If you’re not sure whether a plan covers a particular college expense, the college’s financial aid office should be able to help.

Check with the school to find out exactly what’s required so you can avoid accidentally taking a nonqualified distribution. If you withdraw money for anything that doesn’t meet the qualified expense criteria, any part of the distribution that is made up of earnings on contributions will be taxed as ordinary income and could incur a 10% federal penalty. However, the penalty may be waived if there are extenuating circumstances, such as the disability or death of the beneficiary, or if the beneficiary receives a scholarship, veteran’s educational assistance, or other nontaxable education payment that isn’t a gift or inheritance.

If a distribution from a 529 plan is later refunded by an eligible educational institution, a recontribution can be made to the 529 plan. The recontribution must be made no more than 60 days after the date of the refund. The recontributed amount cannot exceed the amount of the refund.

Keep good records

Your 529 savings plan administrator will, in most cases, provide an annual statement that reports your contributions and earnings, including the amount you withdrew from the plan. But it’s you, not your program provider, who is responsible for accurately reporting to the IRS. If your withdrawals are equal to or less than your qualified higher education expenses (QHEEs), then your withdrawals including all your earnings are tax-free. If your withdrawals are higher than your QHEE, then taxes, and potentially a penalty, will be due on earnings that exceed your qualified expenses. For many people, keeping track is easy because large tuition bills use up most of their 529 savings. But if you are using your 529 plan for room and board expenses, it’s smart to keep those receipts.

When divorced, you’ll need to find a way to make sure the IRS receives the correct information. You’ll either need to work together with your spouse each year on what expenses each of you will turn into the IRS or you’ll want one only spouse to handle a particular child’s education costs and reporting needs.

Decide how to withdraw the funds

It’s important that withdrawals you take from your 529 savings account match the payment of qualifying expenses in the same tax year. Like some families, you may choose to pay the school directly from your 529 account for ease in recordkeeping and matching distributions to school expenses. In this situation, make sure you are aware of school payment deadlines and the time required to transfer funds from the 529 account to the school. It can take several days for investments to be sold out of your 529 account and mailed to the school and then a week or so for the payment to make it through the mail and then processed by the school.

Or you may choose to move money from your 529 account to your bank or brokerage account. Many colleges prefer payments to be made electronically through their website from a bank or brokerage account. You can choose to pay bills first and then reimburse yourself from the 529 account, or you can pull money from the 529 account and then use it to pay bills from your bank or brokerage account. This path also provides flexibility when paying smaller bills like those for books or off-campus room and board.

Keep in mind that you must submit your request for the cash within the same calendar year—not the same academic year—as you make the payment. If the timing is off, you risk owing tax because it’s considered a nonqualified withdrawal.

Prioritize which 529 accounts to spend from first

If your child has more than one 529 savings account, such as an additional account through a divorced co-parent or a grandparent, knowing which account to use first or how to take advantage of them concurrently could help. Don’t leave decisions to the last minute—instead, sit down with all plan owners and decide on a withdrawal strategy ahead of time to make sure the qualifying college costs are divvied up in the most beneficial way.

Also, if financial aid is in the picture, a distribution from a grandparent-owned 529 account may be considered income to the child on the next financial aid application, which could significantly affect aid. To avoid any problems, grandparents can take distributions from 529s as early as the spring of the student’s sophomore year—right after the last tax year on the student’s last undergraduate Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), assuming the student finishes college within 4 years. Wait until the following spring to employ this strategy if it looks like your child will take 5 years to graduate.

Money left over in your 529 plan?

With careful planning, you can avoid having money left over in your 529 account once your child graduates. But if funds remain, there are several options available. You can let the money sit in the account in anticipation of your child continuing on to graduate school or another post-secondary institution. If so, you’ll want to rethink your investment strategy depending on how soon the funds will be needed so you can take full advantage of the potential for growth over time.

You also have the ability to change beneficiaries without incurring tax consequences. Here are 2 different options for maintaining your tax advantage and avoiding any penalty:

  1. Change the designated beneficiary to another member of the original beneficiary’s family. IRS Publication 970 has a lengthy list detailing which relatives count as family.  This can be done for any reason, but is an option particularly if your child receives a scholarship or decides not to attend college.
  2. Roll over funds from the 529 account to the 529 plan of one of your other children of the marriage without penalty. This is a good option if there are funds left over after graduation.

Either way, we encourage you to draft in your divorce decree what you will do if your children don’t use all of the 529 account funds.  Each child has until the age of 30 to use the funds.  At that point, you can either withdraw the funds and gift it to the child or the parents can divide the remaining funds 50/50 at the end of the time period.

Regardless of which option you choose, you will want to spell it out in your divorce decree today.  Also, each state has different restrictions on 529 accounts, so check with your financial advisor or ask your plan provider for the specific requirements of your plan.

What if the beneficiary gets a scholarship?

You’ll be happy to learn that there is a scholarship exception to the 10% penalty. You can take a nonqualified withdrawal from a 529 account up to the amount of a scholarship; although you will pay taxes on the earnings, you won’t pay the additional 10% penalty that’s imposed on a nonqualified withdrawal. Remember to ask for a scholarship receipt for your tax records.

Consider how college savings affect student aid and loans

While individual colleges may treat assets held in a 529 plan differently, in general these assets have a relatively small effect on federal financial aid eligibility. Because 529 plan assets are considered assets of the parent, they tend to have a small effect when the government calculates your financial aid eligibility, whereas accounts that are considered assets of the child, such as an UGMA or UTMA account, tend to have a greater effect on federal financial aid eligibility. (This does not affect 529 accounts that are owned by a grandparent.) For more information, read about financial aid planning.

If you’re thinking of taking out loans that start incurring interest immediately, you may want to spend 529 funds first, deferring these loans until later. Another situation that would call for using 529 plan funds first would be if there’s a chance your child may graduate earlier or receive some other funding down the road, such as a scholarship.

Create a Plan for Dividing 529 Plans in Divorce

At some point, you’ll actually need to start spending the money you’ve set aside. You will need to think about preserving gains you may have made so that funds will be there when they’re needed. If your plan relies on an age-based investment strategy, this process is already in place and your asset mix has slowly evolved toward more conservative investments like money market funds and short-term bonds.

Now’s the time to sit down with your divorce team and decide the best ways of dividing 529 plans in divorce, how to use these funds and who will be in control of the funds going forward.  The more you decide today, the less you have to decide in the future when the safety of your divorce attorney in negotiations with your spouse is gone.

What is a Certified Divorce Financial Analyst or CDFA?

What is a Certified Divorce Financial Analyst or CDFA?

It seems incredibly unfair that at a time when you are dealing with the emotional stress of separating from your spouse, you also have to deal with worrisome and complicated financial issues too. As much as any other time in your financial life, it is vital to get professional help with your money questions when you are experiencing a divorce. One person in particular who take a lot of weight off your shoulders is a Certified Divorce Financial Analyst or CDFA®.    For many clients, divorce is the largest financial transaction of their lives. The role of a CDFA® professional is to address the special financial issues of divorce and help litigants achieve a settlement that will work both today and in the future.

Prerequisites

The Institute for Divorce Financial Analysts (IDFA™) is the premier national organization dedicated to the certification, education and promotion of the use of financial professionals in the divorce arena.  The IDFA sets the standards for all CDFA professionals.  The eligibility requirements for CDFA’s are established by the Board of Advisors and reflect the fact that a CDFA is not an entry-level designation but an advanced program.

Individuals with a minimum of three years of professional experience in finance or divorce and a Bachelors degree are eligible to enroll in the CDFA® Program. IDFA will accept ten years of professional experience from those candidates that do not have a Bachelor’s degree. This includes experience as a financial professional, accountant, or matrimonial lawyer. Candidates should also have working knowledge of financial calculators before purchasing the program.

Skillset of a Certified Divorce Financial Analyst

Divorce Financial Planning is the application of the discipline of financial planning to settlement strategies in divorce. The process requires the synthesis of tax, insurance, retirement and other areas of knowledge with their specific application to divorce. CDFA holders must possess experience with a and a strong knowledge base of a multitude of divorce related financial and legal issues, including:

• Personal vs. Marital Property
• Valuing and Dividing Property
• Retirement Assets and Pensions
• Spousal and Child Support
• Splitting the House
• Tax Problems and Solutions
• Expert Witness Testimony
• Tax Law and Financial Issues Affecting Divorce

 

Maintaining the CDFA Designation

Once a candidate completes the CDFA® course, the designation is valid for one year, after which a fee must be paid annually.  To assure continuing competency in tax codes, legislative and other ongoing developments in the field of divorce financial planning, a candidate must report 15 hours of divorce-related continuing education every two years.

Code of Ethics

The Code of Ethics and Professional Responsibility is provided as an expression of the ethical standards that IDFA has adopted and every CDFA professional has agreed to abide by. The code applies to every CDFA designee and candidate in conducting divorce-planning work.

1. Integrity: Maintain the highest standard of honesty and integrity when dealing with colleagues, IDFA, clients or lawyers.

2. Competence: In addition to satisfying the continuing education requirement needed to maintain the use of the designation, every CDFA professional should serve their clients competently. Therefore, acquiring the knowledge and skill necessary to do so in the area of divorce planning is required.

3. Objectivity: Objectivity requires a CDFA professional to be intellectually honest and impartial. Regardless of who hired him or her, a CDFA professional will always be objective when dealing with clients and their lawyers.

4. Fairness: To alleviate the risk of potential conflict of interest as well as to not confuse the public, CDFA professionals should separate their financial practices and their divorce-planning practices to ensure divorce-planning recommendations are made independent of the potential financial planning relationship.

5. Confidentiality: CDFA professionals shall hold client information to the highest standard of confidentiality. Short of client consent or appropriate legal process, a CDFA professional shall not release any information about their client before, during or after the divorce.

6. Professionalism: A CDFA professional’s interactions shall project the highest level of professionalism. Whether dealing with clients, lawyers, IDFA or any of its partners or subsidiaries, a CDFA professional will behave in a professional manner.

7. Scope: A CDFA professional, by education and training, is a specialist dealing in the financial issues of divorce. Working alongside the lawyer who is licensed to practice law, a CDFA professional must never (unless licensed to do so) advise clients on their legal rights.

8. Compliance: A CDFA professional will comply with all the laws related to the business they conduct and report to IDFA any actions by other CDFA professionals that are illegal or in violation of this code. In addition, a Certified Divorce Financial Analyst professional will comply with any requests from IDFA for information regarding any complaints brought against him or her. If IDFA, after comprehensive investigation, decides that either suspension or revocation of the CDFA designation is the proper remedy, a CDFA professional will comply with the order.

9. Unauthorized Practice of Law: A CDFA professional understands that in order to practice law, one has to be licensed. Under no circumstances will a CDFA professional represent that the IDFA certification is a license to practice law.

10. Support: A CDFA professional will always support our profession and IDFA as the main driving force behind the progress of the profession.  Additionally, a CDFA professional will not collude, debase or discredit IDFA or the profession

 

Do you need a CDFA?

Simply put, if you and your spouse have assets of significant value, the financial ramifications can be quite complicated. At this emotional time, it’s best to trust someone experienced with these kinds of issues rather than trying to learn on-the-fly. Money mistakes made at this time could have far-reaching consequences for your new life.

How do I find a Certified Divorce Financial Analyst?

The easiest way to enlist the services of a CDFA is to ask your divorce attorney for a recommendation. If you want to find one on your own, the Institute for Divorce Financial Analysts can help you locate an analyst in your area. Find them here.

You will likely find having one less thing to worry about—or several less things—during this difficult time is of tremendous value to you. A CDFA can lift some of the burden from your decision-making load.  Schedule an appointment today with Denise French, CDFA who not only has the professional experience to help you with the finances of your divorce, but she’s walked through her own divorce and can help you navigate yours.

Dividing Financial Assets During Divorce In a Volatile Market

Dividing Financial Assets During Divorce In a Volatile Market

The U.S. stock market continues to be a daily surprise — sometimes shock — to investors and businesses across the country. While there’s never a promise of financial gains in the stock market, there are times, such as now, during which anxiety about your financial security is heightened.  Divorce is also a time when financial anxieties grow. When the stock market and economy go crazy, you might worry you’d be crazy to pursue a divorce in a volatile market.

Economic fears are understandable, but you can get divorced during a tumultuous market and still come out with your financial security intact. You will just have to be extra careful and strategic during property division negotiations.  This is also a critical time to enlist a Certified Divorce Financial Analyst (CDFA) on your divorce team.

 

Know Type of Accounts and Cost Basis

If you are like many working couples, you have money saved in retirement accounts like an IRA or 401(K) as well as other money invested in the stock market.

A retirement account is also called a qualified account.  When you take funds out of an IRA to cash in your bank the money is taxed fully as if you had worked for a company and earned that money.  If you are under 59.5 years old you may also be hit with a 10% penalty on IRA accounts taken out in cash.  Conversely, if you cash funds out of a 401(k) or other ERISA governed group retirement plan owned by your spouse, you will still be taxed on those funds, but you will not pay the 10% penalty if you take them out pursuant to a divorce and a Qualified Domestic Relations Order or QDRO.  This all applies to a cash distribution.  Any retirement funds you move into your own IRA will have no tax due.

During volatile markets when the values are low, it will be wise to work with a Certified Divorce Financial Analyst to determine if now is the best time to convert these funds to a ROTH IRA.  If you do so, you will pay tax now on the lower values but not pay any tax in the future on the growth of the account or distributions from the account years down the road at retirement age. Further you can also use ROTH IRA funds within certain parameters, for a first time home purchase or for education.

The non-retirement accounts are non-qualified accounts. The taxes related to these accounts are handled differently than taxes tied to qualified, retirement accounts.   When addressing non-qualified accounts and stocks, pay attention to cost basis. The cost basis of an individual security (stock) is the cost you and/or your spouse paid for it at the beginning. Let’s assume you both decide to split the value of the stocks.  You want to look at more than the current value of your investments. You need to know which stocks have increased in value since you bought into them and which have decreased in value.  This might sound backwards, but the stocks that have decreased in value compared to their cost basis can be better for your finances in a divorce. Why? Simply because of taxation. If the government sees there’s been a financial loss, you aren’t taxed for that. If you only get the share of stocks that have increased in value, the taxes you pay in capital gains could result in a lower payout for you.

 

Stock Market Risk Tolerance

Another factor to consider is the experience and comfort of the spouse who originally managed the account versus the spouse who is receiving the account.  For example, just because the spouse who traditionally handled the accounts is very aggressive and has a comfort level with stock market risk, the other spouse taking over those funds may not.  The accounts may need to be moved into a different set of stocks or other assets for the comfort level of the spouse taking over the stock account, especially in a turbulent market.

We had a client who’s spouse was a financial advisor.  He was very comfortable with stock market risk and understood complex investment concepts.  His wife had never had to worry about their investments.  We took over her account after the divorce and found it was invested in an extremely aggressive S&P 500 2x portfolio which meant it moved like the S&P 500 did, only twice as far.  In up markets that is great, they captured double the return of the markets. However, in down markets it would be catastrophic. We moved her into a more conservative portfolio which proved to be very helpful when the markets fell.

 

The Wording Will Make All the Difference

When dividing divorce assets and debts, the estate will usually be divided as of a certain date.  In Texas, you will typically be mandated to attend at least one mediation.  When you choose to finalize the details of your estate in mediation, that tends to be the date of division.  After mediation, attorneys will draft your divorce decree from the mediated settlement agreement, review it with you and then schedule a date and time to attend court to finalize your divorce.  These steps take time.  The date of division could be months away from the actual date of divorce (when you can start dividing the assets) which is why the wording in your division is so important.

For those who finalized the division of their estate in mediation in December of 2019 but didn’t get divorced until March of 2020, the wording would be critical.  For example, if you had stated you wanted a set amount you would be thrilled because the market losses would not affect you (unless the account became smaller than what you were awarded).  Conversely, if you agreed to take 50% of the estate including gains and losses in the account you will participate in the market swings whether up or down.

No matter which option your choose and agree to in mediation, a set dollar amount or a percent of the estate, you will want to understand what you are choosing and have some level of control over the assets in such a volatile market.  This should provide peace of mind in knowing roughly what you are getting in your estate settlement.  You can also request the funds be put in more conservative investments while the divorce finalization is pending. You do not have to sit in fear throughout this process, you just need to have help from someone who understands how this works.

 

Divorce in a Volatile Market: Keep Calm and Invest On

It is very common within a marriage for one spouse to control the investment decisions and the other spouse to not. If you were the spouse who did not make investing decisions, you aren’t alone in not fully understanding how the markets and investments work. For many who get divorced, the marriage ends and, suddenly, they are left wondering how to manage a stock portfolio.   This new post-divorce reality can lead to anxiety. Worry about affording life after divorce, along with the felt ignorance when faced with the stock market, can result in a knee-jerk financial decisions. Many with less experience running the finances will choose to simply cash out all the stocks they received through the division of assets. Making the decision to cash out from an emotional place may provide some immediate relief; but could really hurt you in the long run.  While cash is the best place for an emergency fund and for safety for part of a portfolio in a falling market, it is also the one asset class proven to lose money to inflation over the long term.

A focus on financial planning for the future, however, can be a growth opportunity after divorce, both in the metaphorical sense and in terms of your net worth. The financial markets can be your friend. That may be difficult to believe, particularly at times when stock market volatility is an everyday headline, but the facts are clear: the US stock market is one of the best investments you can make. History of the stock market has shown investing long-term is a strategic way to financially survive, even with volatile markets.

You Don’t Have to be a Financial Expert

When you decide to divorce in a volatile market, you aren’t signing up to become a financial expert.   However, it is wise to hire one.   During difficult market times it can be very scary but enlisting a Certified Divorce Financial Analyst or CDFA who is well versed in both the details of a divorce financial division and stock markets can be very helpful.  Many CDFA’s are experienced financial planners and advisors who have been through their own divorce and understand what you are going through both professionally and personally.  These professionals understand the markets and investing.  They are also trained to work specifically with divorcing couples and individuals and understand how divorce finance works.  These professionals can help you as they only focus on the finances a divorce case, and will work alongside you and your divorce attorney.

If you have questions or concerns about the financials of your divorce, schedule a call or video conference with us today to get the answers you need.

Mediation versus Court in Divorce

Mediation versus Court in Divorce

“I’ll get my day in Texas divorce court!”  …….   “The judge won’t like what you did!”   ……..   “I’m going to spread your dirt all over the courtroom!”

We’ve all heard someone say these things. Guess what…You really don’t want your day in court! Here’s why:

Expensive Legal Fees

The longer you drag out the process, the more your estate will suffer. You could spend $50,000, $60,000 or more on the divorce process and that is less money for you to divide! Wouldn’t you rather use that money for…hmmm…ANYTHING ELSE?? Texas divorce court costs so much money because there is so much preparation. Court is war. You want your attorney (or lead warrior) to be fully prepared which requires time and information. We’ve seen multiple families spend $50,000, $60,000, $100,000 or more on their divorce.  Fighting just to “get him” or “nail her” could likely just transfer your kids college funds into your lawyer’s kids’ college funds without much for you to show for it.

Time in “Limbo”

Divorce is beyond painful. I know!! I’ve been there. I’ve sat in front of the judge and even though I “won” that battle, the war was lost by everyone in our family.  It was excruciating. I know there could have been a better way to achieve the same goal without the long, drawn out battle which cost us so much effort, time, energy and hurt our child. As long as you are in the process of divorce, it will be impossible for you to begin the process of healing and moving on with your life. Ask yourself how much time you really want to spend in this “limbo” state.

A Stranger Deciding the Future of your Family

The stranger in the black robe that has never met you, your spouse, or your children will be deciding your future and more importantly your children’s futures! To make it worse, they’re basing these decisions based on a fraction of information they’ve been given about your life…and then a fraction of THAT is what they’ll actually consider relevant. Frightening!

Mediation

In most Texas counties, you will be required to attend mediation before the court will hear your case. For the reasons stated above, embrace the idea of creating solutions for your future that will work for both of you. This is your chance to keep control of what you really want while creating a cooperative environment of giving your spouse what’s important to them as well. There is a solution – it may take hours to get there, but there is a solution. You only need the right people to help you find creative settlement options.  You need a strong attorney and if your estate is of any significant size and/or you are middle age or older,  you’ll need a financial expert helping you as well.

Preparing for Mediation

Your attorney.

Your attorney is your strongest ally and support. They are there for legal counsel and guidance.  You hired them, now trust them! They know the law, the court you are in, and have walked through thousands of divorces before you.

A Certified Divorce Financial Analyst or CDFA®

While attorneys know the law and the courts, a CDFA knows divorce finance and tax. We are financial advisors specifically trained to work with divorcing clients.  I’ve been the client so not only do I understand the work professionally, I understand it personally.   When you have property, investment accounts, savings accounts, retirement accounts, etc., it’s important to realize how you split things today will have a significant effect on your future.  We have saved clients thousands of dollars in tax savings, helped create win-win solutions, and provided peace of mind by using the settlement options in mediation to create financial plans. We help you by working out those details in mediation before you sign an agreement.   Leave mediation knowing you made informed financial decisions and with a clear vision of your future.

If you’re facing Texas divorce court, call Divorce Strategies Group!!  You only have one chance to get the estate division right – having a financial expert on your team just makes sense!

Life Insurance & Divorce

Life Insurance & Divorce

Many of our clients come to us before divorce mediation with some type of life insurance. The question we hear weekly is “Can I keep the life insurance policy in the divorce?”  Well, it depends.   You can keep many types of contracts, but you need to know what you own before you decide who is keeping what.   There are many variables in a life insurance contract and other questions you also need answers to.  Are you the owner? Is there cash value? Can you remain as the beneficiary when you are divorced?  It’s important to understand the parties and their rights in a life insurance contract, how your state treats ex-spouses, and the basic types of contracts.

The parties involved

The Owner This is the person or entity who has control over the policy, can gather information on the policy from the carrier and has control to change beneficiaries. This person or entity has total control over the policy and unless blocked, can change the beneficiary at the insurance company level.

Annuitant – This is the person whom the policy is based on. If this person dies, a death benefit is paid. Often, the owner and annuitant are the same person, but not always.

Beneficiary – This is the person who receives the death benefit if the annuitant dies. A primary beneficiary receives the funds first. If this person dies before the annuitant or with the annuitant, the contingent beneficiaries receive the funds. In Texas, per Texas Family Code 9.301 in the situation of an ex-spouse who has not been re-designated as the beneficiary after the divorce, the ex-spouse will be skipped over and the other primary and/or contingent beneficiaries will be paid.

Paying a death benefit to the ex-spouse

In Texas, if a spouse was designated as a beneficiary before the divorce and not re-designated after divorce, and not designated in the divorce decree as the beneficiary of the policy, he/she is written out and/or skipped over by the life insurance company per Texas Family Code 9.301. For example, Tom purchases a 20-year term policy for $2 Million and named his current wife Susan as the primary beneficiary and their three adult children equally as the contingent beneficiaries. Seven years later Tom and Susan divorce and the policy remains unchanged.  It’s a term policy worth nothing so it was, honestly, just forgotten in the divorce negotiations.  It was not addressed at all in the divorce decree.  A year after the divorce, Tom dies suddenly of heart failure. In this case, Susan may not receive the death benefit, the children may instead.

If Susan had been written into their divorce decree as the beneficiary of the policy the insurance company would review the decree and likely pay Susan, however, the interim stress and strain could all be thwarted with a new beneficiary designation with the insurance company after the divorce.

Irrevocable and revocable beneficiary

Even if the ex-wife is re-designated as the beneficiary after the divorce, the owner still has control to change a regular, revocable beneficiary – no matter what your divorce decree states. We strongly suggest the ex-spouse make you an irrevocable beneficiary if you want to remain the policy beneficiary. As an irrevocable beneficiary you cannot be written out as beneficiary without your consent.  For example, let’s assume instead of dying a year after the divorce, Tom remarries Daniele.  Tom makes Daniele the primary beneficiary after they are married, even though the Texas divorce decree states that Susan should remain primary beneficiary of the same policy.  Then a year after marrying Daniele, Tom dies. We are still within the original 20-year term period only now the insurance company has a designation from Tom to pay his current wife Daniele, so they will likely pay Daniele.   The divorce decree states that Susan should remain the beneficiary – so at the very least there is a fight on Susan’s hands and she may not in the end receive the funds at all.  Had Susan and her divorce attorney mandated that Susan be designated the IRREVOCABLE beneficiary, there would be no confusion.  Tom could not have made Daniele the new beneficiary or he would have had to open a new policy for Daniele alone.

Types of policies

Term Life – This is simply a term life insurance policy meaning you pay a certain premium for insurance for a certain term or period of time. If the insured dies within that term period, the beneficiary receives the death benefit. If the owner stops paying premiums, the policy lapses and is gone. There is no cash value with a term policy. The policy is worth nothing today and only worth something if the annuitant dies. This policy should be on your divorce estate spreadsheet, but the value is $0. It’s the death benefit that is worth something and conversely, costs something each month, and it should be discussed in the divorce negotiations especially if you still have minor children. While child support is typically an obligation of the estate, that obligation would be far less than a million or multi-million term life policy.

Whole Life Policy – This is permanent policy that pays either a dividend or a set interest rate. As with term life, regular premiums are due with whole life policies for a predetermined period. Whole life can grow over time, but it is costly in the early years. You pay a premium for the cost of insurance in the earlier years only to have that cost not rise in later years. These policies have cash value and should be listed with that value on your divorce estate spreadsheet. The policies should be discussed and negotiated for in the divorce. There is a monthly premium for these policies as well and that should also be discussed and negotiated.

Universal Life Policy – This is a permanent policy that, like whole life, has cash value. Universal Life policies are more flexible as there is no set premiums due. There were illustrations ran when the policy was purchased with what the parties agreed to pay, but no mandated premium payments. If you don’t pay the premiums, the policy will use the cash value to pay the premiums. If no premiums are paid, it will lapse only if there is insufficient cash value to pay premiums. Universal policies utilize some type of underlying investment – the investment can be a fixed rate, a mutual fund type of account in the markets or an indexed policy tied to the markets but unable to technically go below 0% if the markets have a down year. Most of the policies we use with our investment clients through our sister firm, French Financial Group, are universal life policies are they are more flexible, have better options for growth and can be morphed to use for either tax free cash later in life for the owner or death benefit for their heirs. This is certainly an asset to go on the estate spreadsheet to be discussed and negotiated.

An in-force illustration can be run on the universal policies and the whole life policies. These illustrations will show how long you have, based on performance and your specific contract parameters, to keep the policy and use the cash value for premiums. These illustrations take several days to run, so order them well before your mediation date.

If you have life insurance or other financial questions call us. We offer strategy sessions to help you understand what you own and develop a plan for your future.